4 ways to send & receive far fewer emails (review of Cal Newport’s A World Without Email)

A world without email seems like an impossible, beautiful dream. But a world with far fewer emails? That’s doable and Cal Newport knows the way. The Georgetown University computer science professor has spent five years studying how email affects us at work. To no one’s surprise, it’s not a pretty picture. Research shows email makesContinue reading “4 ways to send & receive far fewer emails (review of Cal Newport’s A World Without Email)”

Serve up community in your post-pandemic lunch room (review of The Lonely Century)

Putting communal tables in your lunchroom may be your best post-pandemic recruitment and retention strategy. To fill those tables, encourage everyone to break for lunch. Discourage us introverts from always eating “al desko.”  Introduce dig-in potlucks and occasionally splurge on ordering in a meal. Keep smartphones out of the lunchroom so we look up, lookContinue reading “Serve up community in your post-pandemic lunch room (review of The Lonely Century)”

How to avoid a climate disaster (review)

My mom put gas in her car for the first time since November and she doesn’t drive a hybrid. The pandemic’s parked cars and planes the world over. Many of us have spent the past year working from home and we’ve gone nowhere beyond the grocery store. Yet it’s estimated that greenhouse gas emissions haveContinue reading “How to avoid a climate disaster (review)”

Rediscovering our sense of humour at work (review of Humor, Seriously)

I used to have a sense of humour. In university, I drew a daily cartoon strip for the student paper about a sorority sister and fraternity brother. Profs taped the strip to their office doors. A candidate for student council president promised to ban the strip if elected. He lost. Early in my career, IContinue reading “Rediscovering our sense of humour at work (review of Humor, Seriously)”

Stop sharing and cut to the chase (review of Joel Schwartzberg’s Get to the Point!)

Sharing is caring unless you’re sharing a few thoughts. And then it’s exhausting for us and a wasted opportunity for you. Buried in your thoughts may well be an idea that’ll make our world a better place.  But we’re not waiting around to hear about your big idea if you can’t cut to the chase.Continue reading “Stop sharing and cut to the chase (review of Joel Schwartzberg’s Get to the Point!)”

What’s luck got to do with it? Pretty much everything (review of Michael Sandel’s The Tyranny of Merit)

Three things have yet to happen as I hit the 28-year mark in my career. I’ve never been laid off, fired or had a daily commute beyond 20 minutes. What’s been the secret to my success? Dumb luck and good fortune. I’ve been blessed with patient bosses who’ve believed in second and third chances. I’veContinue reading “What’s luck got to do with it? Pretty much everything (review of Michael Sandel’s The Tyranny of Merit)”

Ditch the presentation & have a conversation (review of Eric Bergman’s One Bucket at a Time)

There’s only one good reason to bring us together for a meeting on Zoom or in a room. Walking us through PowerPoint decks isn’t it. “The only reason for bringing people together, whether in person or remotely, is to listen to someone share something of value,” says Eric Bergman, presentation skills coach and author ofContinue reading “Ditch the presentation & have a conversation (review of Eric Bergman’s One Bucket at a Time)”

Your male colleague says something sexist? It’s your two-second litmus test moment (review of Good Guys)

I failed the test but I’ll be ready for the next one. I was in a meeting with a manager who kept mentioning “his girls”. He wasn’t talking about his preteen daughters. He was referring to his colleagues around the boardroom table.   I shot the women a sympathetic look but didn’t call out the manager.Continue reading “Your male colleague says something sexist? It’s your two-second litmus test moment (review of Good Guys)”

Millennials were burning out long before COVID hit (review of Anne Helen Petersen’s Can’t Even)

Good on bosses who end Zoom calls by reminding us not to sacrifice our health and wellbeing during the pandemic. But our millennial colleagues could use more than reminders. They’ve been wrestling with burnout long before COVID-19 knocked the world off its axis. And while our leaders’ intentions are good, what ails millennials can’t beContinue reading “Millennials were burning out long before COVID hit (review of Anne Helen Petersen’s Can’t Even)”

The epic rise & spectacular fall of WeWork & Adam Neumann (review)

Today’s overworked, underpaid and unappreciated employee is tomorrow’s confidential source for a reporter. And disgruntled workers will happily talk as it all goes wrong for leaders lacking in hubris. In writing about the rise and fall of shared office renter WeWork, journalist Reeves Wiedeman did more than 200 interviews over 18 months with employees atContinue reading “The epic rise & spectacular fall of WeWork & Adam Neumann (review)”